Lost: The End
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
  • vincentvincent
    Member
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
    Desmond was special from the beginning, or, at least, from the time he got himself blown up during the second hatch event.  I can see how his warp through time changed him, making him aware of his own death and afterlife, which explains his role in Sideways.  What I don't get is what Widmore intended to use him for or why MIB needed him.  His influence was felt only in Sideways.  In fact, if the other people on the island had died, it wouldn't have made a difference in the big scheme of things, at least as far as Desmond was involved. 

    Was the problem that if MIB escaped, all time/space would cease to exist? There would be no Sideways? There'd be no heaven/glowly afterlife/move-on place?  I don't get why MIB would want to deprive people of an afterlife.  We were given no indication of his inclinations in this regard, so I'm left scratching my head at all of it.
  • vincentvincent
    Member
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
  • vincentvincent
    Member
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
    It looks fine, Vince. Thanks!

    I guess if that's the True Hollywood Story, I have to believe it, but Desmond, Penny, and Juliet weren't in Season 1, so why were they in the church?  Little oversights like that make me wonder about some of this dude's convictions.
  • I read about this post elsewhere, and it's already been confirmed that he's not from Bad Robot, but obviously has a little bit of inside info from somewhere.
  • See, my thought on the whole matter is that - when Jack - or even Hurley - drank the water and were quickened (or whatever we're calling it), they SHOULD have gained access to the knowledge of what was up. At that point ONE of them should have been bursting at the seams to articulate what they'd learned... to Sawyer, to Flocke, whatever. Even a LITTLE bit. Even some sort of off-the-cuff comment could have done it, if only to make something cemented.

    For example, let's play with it as if my own pet theory about what the island was had been true. Hurley takes the drink that Jack gives him, and as soon as he gulps it down gasps "Atlantis... This was Atlantis?!?" Even something like that. Fill in whatever you want "It's a crashed ship..." "It's like the Guardian of Forever..." Know what I mean? SOMETHING. SOMETHING that at least signified the ability for you, me, and Joe Shmoe to get on Wikipedia and look it up. But no, they decided to not say anything. It's cheap.

    It's one thing to leave open the ending of The Usual Suspects or Memento in order to make the audience ask "wow... just how much of what I saw / what that character said was real?" and it's another thing to say "the mysteries will be answered" and then just not have anybody say anything that even relates to said mystery. For that, this is an unsatisfying ending to the SERIES. To the CHARACTERS... well we can go round and round to decide if that's satisfying. But come on. How many people tuned in every week to see if Jack was gonna get past his daddy-issues, or if Sawyer would become a nice guy who cared about other people?

    It was a series about someTHING that happened to have characters we came to care about to varying degrees. To pull a bait-and-switch is a slap in the face. To go along with the "42" concept, the whole point of that in Hitchhiker's Guide was to show EXACTLY this... that it was an unsatisfying answer. Further, in that series, the problem with 42 being an answer was that nobody knew what the QUESTION Deep Thought was answering WAS... We knew the question of Lost. If nothing else, it was WHERE ARE WE? And they closed the book without ever answering it. What we got was:

    Once upon a time, there was a plane. And aboard the plane there were some people who had lived some lousy lives... most of them because they had no real connection to anyone in the world. They crashed on an island which seemed to have magic powers, where they spent years trying to understand where they were and why things happened. Most of their time was spent trying to find a way home. But even when some of them did, they came back to the island, drawn by something big and mysterious and important, even though they didn't know why. Eventually they died, but because they had lived through so much together, they (after)lived happily ever after.

    Now... on the one hand, yes. We did deal with the fact that a group of people who were adrift in the world came to no longer be adrift because of each other. In a very literary sense, it's fantastic that this happened in a place that was itself disconnected from the rest of the world. But seriously. So what?

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