LOST: What They Died For
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
    I called last night's ep: "Adventures in Nihilism" because everything was shown to mean nothing.

    "What They Died For" = nothing.  The names on the cave wall were just lines in chalk, says Jacob.  Like sands through the hour glass, so are the days of our lives. You're not specially protected or anything. Want to be a candidate, Kate? Go ahead.  I was doing you a favor because, like the Sorceress of Castle Grayskull, the magical island is no place to raise a kid, but whatever.  However, when he faces personal crises in his early 20's and is compelled to undertake life-threatening adventures to discover what happened to his mother, don't blame me. (See "Teela's Quest" and "The Origins of the Sorceress" for the necessary background material).

    Why they were selected: Their lives were empty. They had nothing.

    Widmore and Liz Lemon's deaths: A mere notch on the body count belt.  Their lives meant nothing in the grand scheme.

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    OK, but if Sun and Jin and Sayid could die, why couldn't Jack?  IMO, it's because of the bending of time and Jacob's "magical" nature.  He knew Jack would step up, so Jack was protected.  Nobody else was.  It helps to be immortal when it comes to stuff like that.

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    I'm not going to mince words... Jacob is a douche.  Last week he was a whiny momma's boy, and this week... I can't put my finger on what it is exactly, but he talks with so much gravitas, I find it kinda funny.

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    I hope Richard wasn't killed.  With Lapidus dead and Desmond missing, Hurley is the only character left whom I still like.  Thank goodness there's only 2 hours left (1 actual hour of programming, as I figure, considering the Superbowl-like nature of the anticipated viewership for the finale and the resultant advertizer feeding frenzy.)
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
    Like I said, Jacob's a douche.
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
    Do you think he's supposed to be a simpleton, as in, written to be, or is it Mark Pellegrino's (sp?) delivery that makes him seem that way?  When he was Rita's ex-con husband on Dexter, he was also rather dopey.  In his latest turn as the vessel for Lucifer on Supernatural, his delivery was the same-- extremely understated to the point of almost being slow.  Makes me wonder if our impression is an accident of casting or intentional.

    Perhaps Desmond's remark about Ana Lucia is further proof that what he's setting up now is the foundation for something that he knows goes down in 3 years.  "She's not ready yet."  Well, if the big ballroom blitz concert is tonight, then it's kinda something of a now-or-never situation, not leaving alot of room for not yet being ready.  If, however, Desmond has to bring the key players together to present a plan that will take a little while to work out, then his observation of Ana Lucia makes sense.

     
  • JayneJayne
    Moderator
    Of the three, I'm curious only about Libby.  While Ana Lucia and Eko both met Jacob's criteria for having crappy, empty lives before the island, their backstories were adequately described.  They were also unnecessary duplicate archetypes.  We already had a man of faith (Locke) and a tough girl running from her past (Kate).  Only Libby's character was infused with any real mystery.

    Let this be a less to all you kids out there: Drinking and driving is a bad idea.
  • Were you all aware that two of the head writers of Lost were the guys behind the 90's attempt at a new Fantasy Island series (with Malcolm McDowell)? Maybe Jack turns the wheel, beams the island elsewhere, and in so doing is kicked off-island, as tends to happen. As the last person there, having sent everyone else off, the island is now uninhabited. Suddenly, the island bursts into being in a far-off section of the Pacific... where it's happened upon by a character played by Michael J. Anderson (Sampson from Carnivale), who's drifting in a small liferaft. He gets to shore, wanders inland... finds Richard, bleeding from - among other things - a broken jaw. Anderson removes his shirt to bind Richard's more dangerous wounds, revealing that he's had quite a bit of ink done. He asks, "Who do this to you, boss? You got a name?" and all Richard can bring himself to say before lapsing into unconsciousness - his own Spanish accent drifting back into his speech after all these years, is Locke's name... unfortunately, with a broken jaw, all that comes out is "Roarke."

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